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    • AU $4,749.00
    • AU $5,149.00
    • AU $5,449.00
    • AU $6,849.00
  • ** Pricing is Per Person twin share, including all taxes.

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Cruise Itinerary

Itinerary may vary by sailing date and itineraries may be changed at the cruise lines discretion. Please check itinerary details at time of booking and before booking other travel services such as airline tickets.

Holland America Line 14 nt Fly Stay Cruise Package

Koningsdam, Mediterranean Rivieras ex Rome Return

Ship: Koningsdam View ship details

Cruise Line: Holland America Line

Selected Sailing Date: 19 Jul 2019

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Special Inclusions

VIEW PDF FOR DETAILS

Inclusions:
- Return economy class airfare with a full service carrier from Sydney, Brisbane or Melbourne to Rome
- Transfer from Airport to Hotel
- 3 nights accommodation in a 4-star hotel in Rome with breakfast+
- Classical Rome Tour: A comprehensive tour of the major monuments of historical Rome^*
- Transfer from Hotel to Port
- 10 night Mediterranean Rivieras cruise onboard Koningsdam from Rome return
- Main Meals~ and entertainment onboard - Transfer from Port to Hotel
- 1 nights accommodation in a 4-star hotel in Rome with breakfast+
- Transfer from Hotel to Airport
- Airport taxes, Port charges and Government fees

BONUS US$50 ONBOARD CREDIT PER TWIN STATEROOM^

Special Conditions

Offer subject to availability at time of booking. Prices are per person based on best available cruise fare, inclusive of all discounts unless otherwise stated. Prices are subject to currency fluctuations and are based on cash or cheque. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Special conditions apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. Outside Cabin prices quoted, can also include Obstructed Cabins. Cruiselines Terms & Conditions apply - Please ask us for details.

Cruise Description

10 Night Cruise sailing roundtrip from Rome onboard Koningsdam.

The first of Holland America Line’s Pinnacle-class ships, Koningsdam combines 21st- century elegance and nautical tradition. Inspired by music, her design features fluid lines, light-filled spaces and innovative, new dining and entertainment venues—from the dazzling, two-story World Stage to Music Walk™, with Lincoln Center Stage, B.B. King’s Blues Club and Billboard Onboard. Truly a destination all her own, there’s much to explore on Koningsdam.

Highlights of this cruise:

Civitavecchia (Rome), Italy
Rome is both a modern bustling city and an ancient open-air museum. You can walk in the footsteps of emperors, have coffee in Renaissance piazzas and see contemporary art all in one afternoon. Your sightseeing time in Rome begins at the nearby port of Civitavecchia, a seaside town with roots that stretch back to the Etruscan era. Take note of the Forte Michelangelo (both Bramante and Michelangelo had a hand in its design), and the lungomare, a lively stretch along the sea with beach clubs, bars and restaurants.

Once in the Eternal City you can fill your day with museums, churches, archaeological sites, traditional trattorias, artisan shops and, of course, gelato. The Colosseum and the Vatican Museums are Rome's superstar attractions, but there are plenty of quieter gems to explore. For food lovers there are the markets in Campo de' Fiori or the slightly farther flung Testaccio. The hip neighborhood of Monti, next to the Colosseum, has a vibrant piazza scene and boutique shopping, while the Villa Borghese offers a green oasis with a view towards Saint Peter’s Basilica and the masterpiece-filled Galleria Borghese. Although Rome might not have been built in one day, you'll certainly be able to see the highlights and top things to do in Rome in 24 hours.

Cartagena, Spain
There are more than two millennia of history to embrace in this port city in Spain's southeastern Murcia region. While Cartagena is famously home to the second-largest Roman amphitheater on the Iberian Peninsula, the city is much more than just spectacular ancient ruins.

In addition to Cartagena’s architecture—along with that amphitheater, there are striking Art Nouveau buildings, neoclassical churches and ultramodern edifices throughout the city—you’ll find many opportunities to shop for local and regional artisan wares. In the city, investigate the restored medieval fortress looking out on the bay from the city’s highest point. Or take a short trip by car or bus to the historic Agrupa Vicenta Mines, the remarkable palm forest at Elche and the holy city of Caravaca.

And the food of sunny Murcia! Friendly tapas bars with breezy terraces invite lingering over drinks, coffee or snacks. The local restaurants offer more than typical Spanish tapas on the menu—michirones (a spicy Murcian bean stew) and local spins on paella are widely available and worth a try. Grilled octopus, fried calamari, mussels and the freshest fish are some of the tasty benefits of the city’s perch beside the sea.

Gibraltar, British Territory
Strategically located at the southern tip of Europe, facing Africa, Gibraltar offers a fascinating mix of cultures. With a history that includes Moorish, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and English influences (among others), this tiny, 6.7-square-kilometer British Overseas Territory is most famous for the giant Jurassic limestone rock soaring above the territory’s main commercial and residential areas. The Rock contains an abundance of history (military and otherwise), not to mention significant flora and fauna, and a labyrinth of caves and tunnels.

Venture into Gibraltar’s densely populated streets for Spanish, British, Middle Eastern and Italian cuisine, as well as tax-free shopping on everything from luxury brands to handmade arts and crafts and artisanal edibles. Browsing and snacking around town is the perfect chance to hear Yanito, the singsong Spanish-English hybrid spoken here. There are also historic and holy places in Europa Point, and the Museum of Gibraltar provides an opportunity to learn about the region’s history and prehistory, as well as the migration habits of its birds and marine life.

Malaga, Spain
While Málaga was long considered just a stopover on the way to southern Spain’s Costa del Sol beach resorts, in recent years a buzz has developed around the Andalucian city. There is a brand-new $100 million port promenade filled with restaurants and a bold new branch of Paris’s Centre Pompidou built in the form of a colorful glass cube. A handful of other major new museums include one devoted to one of the city’s most famous sons, Pablo Picasso—it’s also the hometown of another famous Spanish export, actor Antonio Banderas. Where once many buildings were dilapidated, an entire swath of the historic center is now pedestrianized and filled with shoppers, diners and street musicians. Tapas bars with outdoor tables line the old town’s Calle Strachan, while all over Málaga a boom in fine dining is taking place. The city makes a fine base for day trips to many of Andalucía’s most famous sites. Unlike many southern Spanish cities, Málaga doesn’t really shut down over the hot summer months; its waterfront location helps keep temperatures from soaring to uncomfortable heights. The 10-day summer Feria is becoming more popular each year, drawing visitors with its calendar of bullfights as well as dancing and drinking—activities the city’s residents enjoy before and after the Feria too.

Barcelona, Spain
On the northeast coast of Spain, overlooking the Mediterranean, Barcelona is a vibrant port city, packed with centuries of iconic art and architecture—Gaudí and Picasso both called it home—and lined with sunny white-sand beaches. Explore the Catalan capital's tourist attractions and historic neighborhoods, Modernisme and world-renowned art museums, galleries and local crafts shops—some of which are centuries old and stock traditional Catalan wares. After you see the sights, there are lively tapas bars around every corner where you can stop for a drink, a café amb llet (Catalan for espresso with steamed milk) or a snack, no matter the hour. Green spaces for picnics, long walks and respite from the hustle and bustle are scattered throughout Barcelona's attractions: There's Gaudí's mosaic-decorated park, a neoclassical maze at the Laberint d'Horta, as well as plenty of high places (mountains, monuments and edifices) where sightseeing visitors can take in the view. A short trip from Barcelona by car or train, luxury outlets, cava wineries, a mountaintop abbey and the sandy beaches of the Mediterranean coast await.

Marseille (Provence), France
Marseille, in the south of France, has more spice, grit and edge than the Provençal towns that surround it. A trade city since the time of ancient Greece, the port always seems to be on the brink of change, generating a certain energy that’s hard to find in the timeless and traditional countryside. In fact, sometimes it doesn't seem very French at all.

Thanks to a multicultural population, the culinary scene (with seafood dishes and Michelin-starred restaurants galore) goes beyond the classic steak frites at bistros and brasseries. A 19th-century cathedral presides over the city and the working-class Le Panier district has winding streets flanked by fading facades, while Baroque edifices grace the commercial thoroughfare La Canebière, once compared to the Champs-Élysées.

Marseille’s 2013 turn as the European Capital of Culture sprouted a crop of cultural venues, from striking museums to cutting-edge gallery spaces and thought-provoking concept shops that showcase local talent. The waterfront has been refurbished—and on sunny days, it’s the place for people- and boat-watching from restaurants famous for bouillabaisse or outdoor cafés serving glasses of rosé and pastis.

Livorno (Florence/Pisa), Italy
The Renaissance-era port city of Livorno, Italy, gateway to Pisa, Florence and the rest of the attractions of Tuscany, is characterized by its solid 16th-century Fortezza and the charming canal network known as Venezia Nuova. It’s also famous for cacciucco, a spicy fish stew.

To the north of Livorno, not far from the mouth of the river Arno, lies Pisa, an attractive university city best known for its Leaning Tower. Some 60 miles to the east, and also set on the Arno, is Florence, Tuscany's capital. The concentration of artistic treasures and cultural things to do in Tuscany, from museums and cloisters to bridges and chapels, is second to none—but there is lots more besides sightseeing in Florence. The food and drink culture in Florence takes in tripe stands and hole-in-the-wall wine bars as well as embracing gourmet restaurants and plenty of down-to-earth family-run trattorias. The shopping scene offers the designer stores of Via Tornabuoni and Via Roma, but there are plenty of quirky, independent boutiques too. And then there is Florence’s traditions of leather work, marbled paper, book-binding and furniture restoration. Explore the sights of the arty Oltrarno neighborhood for artisan workshops, great cafés, bars and restaurants and an authentically Florentine atmosphere.

Monte Carlo, Monaco
The tiny and wealthy principality of Monaco, ruled by Prince Albert II, is dominated by the attractions in the resort quarter, Monte Carlo, with its casino, internationally acclaimed Opera House and the Triangle d’Or shopping area. The cliffs of Le Rocher de Monaco rise above the Mediterranean, the strategic stronghold of the Grimaldi family of Genoa who assumed power of this unstable region in 1297. The principality was a quiet backwater until the 1850s when trains put the sun-soaked destination within easy reach of affluent French and British travelers looking for an escape and relaxing things to do. Prince Charles III quickly understood what it would take to seduce the new tourists, and created a Belle Epoque resort featuring the mythic Casino de Monte-Carlo.

Sitting on the coast like a precious gemstone, Monte Carlo and Monaco still draw an international jet-set crowd. The Palace commands from Monaco-ville, called Le Rocher by locals, and high-rises make the most of precious land with public elevators in lieu of sidewalks in this steep country. Superyachts fill the port, ultraluxury cars dominate the road and outrageous jewels sparkle under the night sky in an eternal promise that in some places, fairy tales really do come true.