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Quest, Moroccan & Iberian Sunsets ex Barcelona to Dover

Ship: Seabourn Quest View ship details

Cruise Line: Seabourn

Selected Sailing Date: 19 May 2020

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Category Pricing

Fares displayed are lowest available and may not include Promotional Benefits

Cabin Twin Triple Quad Single
A - Oceanview Suite N/A N/A N/A
A1 - Oceanview Suite N/A N/A N/A
V1 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V2 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V3 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V4 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V5 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
V6 - Veranda Suite N/A N/A N/A
SA - Suite N/A N/A N/A
SV - Suite N/A N/A N/A
PH - Penthouse Suite N/A N/A N/A

** Pricing is Per Person, including all taxes.

* Fares displayed are lowest available and may not include Promotional Benefits

Please note: while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

Cruise Description

20 Night cruise sailing from Barcelona to Dover onboard Seabourn Quest.

Seabourn Quest is the third iteration of the vessel design that has been called “a game-changer for the luxury segment.” True to her Seabourn bloodlines, wherever she sails around the world, Seabourn Quest carries with her a bevy of award-winning dining venues that are comparable to the finest restaurants to be found anywhere. Seabourn Quest offers a variety of dining options to suit every taste and every mood, with never an extra charge.

Highlights of this cruise:

Barcelona, Spain
Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, is said to have been founded by the Phoenicians, and was once the rival of the powerful states of Venice and Genoa for control of the Mediterranean trade. Today, it is Spain's second largest city and has long rivaled, even surpassed Madrid in industry and commerce. The medieval atmosphere of the Gothic Quarter and the elegant boulevards combine to make the city one of Europe's most beautiful. Barcelona's active cultural life and heritage brought forth such greats as the architect Antonio Gaudi, the painter Joan Miro, and Pablo Picasso, who spent his formative years here. Other famous native Catalan artists include cellist Pau Casals, surrealist Salvador Dali, and opera singers Montserrat Caballe and Josep Carreras. Barcelona accomplished a long-cherished goal with the opportunity to host the Olympics in 1992. This big event prompted a massive building program and created a focal point of the world's attention.

Valencia, Spain
Valencia is located in the middle of Europe's most densely developed agricultural region. Originally a Greek settlement, the town was taken over by Romans in 138 BC and turned into a retirement town for old soldiers. The Moors controlled the land for 500 years, and this fertile plain, which today yields three to four crops, was considered to be heaven on earth. El Cid conquered Valencia for Spain in 1094, but it fell back into Moorish hands after his death. Incorporated into Spain in the 15th century, Valencia remains the nation's breadbasket.

Cartagena, Spain
Founded by Carthaginians in the third century BC, this ancient Mediterranean port city exemplifies the region's tumultuous history. Romans, Visigoths, Castilians and Moors have all left their marks. Under King Philip II, Cartagena's naturally deep, sheltered harbor was developed into the nation's premier naval base, a position it still enjoys today. Ancient ramparts remain, as does a lighthouse erected in Moorish times.

Motril (Granada), Spain
This city of the Mediterranean coast is the second largest on the so-called Costa Tropical. But for us it is the port from which to ascend the slopes of the snow-capped Sierra Nevada to the ethereal Moorish city of Granada and the astounding complex of the Alhambra, the most beautiful display of Islamic architecture in Europe. Dramatically sited overlooking the city, the walled series of halls, courts, gardens and colonnades drip with airy carving and elaborate decorative reliefs that embody the term Arabesque. The sprawling Generalife Gardens adjoining the fortress are a memorable site unto themselves. Elsewhere in Granada, the Capilla Real is a purely Spanish Gothic building, holding the marble tombs of the Reyes Catolicos Ferdinand and Isabella behind a gilded wrought-iron screen.

Tangier, Morocco
Situated just across the narrow Strait of Gibraltar from Europe, Tangier has long comprised a hybrid culture that is nearly as European as it is African. Standing atop Cap Spartel, one can gaze down on the place where the Atlantic meets the Mediterranean. The “Hollywood” district where the foreign embassies have traditionally been located reflects the European influence. But ascending the hill above the waterfront, one enters the narrow, winding alleys of the Kasbah, the city’s oldest, most Moroccan section. Down the coast, nearby Tetouan retains a nearly untouched walled medina, with sections originally occupied by Andalusian, Berber and Jewish populations. It is small enough that visitors can explore it without risking becoming lost, making it a perfect choice as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Casablanca, Morocco
Casablanca, located on the Atlantic coast, is with 4 million inhabitants Morocco's largest city, and at the same time the largest port in Africa. Built on the site of ancient Phoenician Anfa, it remained a small fishing village for many centuries until the French arrived in 1912. Since then Casablanca has become a vast modern city, ever on the increase since Morocco's independence from France in 1956. A successful blend of oriental-style, white cubic dwellings with modern Moroccan quarters gives the city an interesting flair. Lovely beaches and attractive hotels make for a popular year-round holiday resort. To help understand Moroccan culture a visit to the Medina, the quaint old Moorish quarter, is a must for all visitors.

Lisbon, Portugal
The great period of "the Discoveries" accounted for phenomenal wealth brought back from India, Africa and Brazil by the great Portuguese navigators. Gold, jewels, ivory, porcelain and spices helped finance grand new buildings and impressive monuments in Lisbon, the country's capital city. As you sail up the Tagus River, be on deck to admire Lisbon's panorama and see some of the great monuments lining the river. Lisbon is one of Europe's smallest capital cities but considered by many visitors to be one of the most likeable. Spread over a string of seven hills, the city offers a variety of faces, including a refreshing no-frills simplicity reflected in the people as they go unhurriedly through their day enjoying a hearty and delicious cuisine accompanied by the country's excellent wines.

Leixoes (Porto), Portugal
The commercial center of northern Portugal and hub of the port wine trade, Porto is a gracious, cosmopolitan city noted for its 12th century cathedral and medieval churches, picturesque narrow streets and wine lodges at Vila Nova de Gaia. It is clustered on hills overlooking a river, and is a northern European style city with granite church towers, narrow streets and hidden Baroque treasures.

A Coruna, Spain
A Coruna is the largest Galician city with a culture uniquely its own, a rich folkloric tradition and its own language. Of historically remote origin, A Coruna has preserved a considerable heritage of monuments and ancient buildings, among which are Romanesque churches and a Roman lighthouse. Its most beautiful and original feature is perhaps the characteristic façade of its houses, which are completely covered by mirador windows.

Falmouth, England, United Kingdom
Falmouth has a fine natural harbor, but has lost its earlier importance as a seaport and now caters mainly to yachts and boating for holidaymakers. Falmouth has the mildest winter climate in England.

Cowes, Isle Of Wight, England, UK
The Georgian harbor town of Cowes, situated on the Isle of Wight, has been the home of international yacht racing since 1815. It is famous for Cowes Week, the largest and longest-running sailing regatta on earth. The Isle of Whyte was once a favored retreat of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Osborne House still retains a large collection of their royal possessions, photography and art.

St Malo (Le Mont Saint Michel), France
The towering monastery of Mont Saint Michel rises from the tidal flats, cut off twice a day by the sea. Ascend the spiral street to see the spare monastic chambers .

Cherbourg (Normandy), France
The seaport and naval station of Cherbourg is situated along the English Channel northwest of Paris at the mouth of the Divette River. Believed to rest on the site of an ancient Roman station, Cherbourg has been occupied since ancient times and was frequently contested by the French and English in the Middle Ages because of its strategic location. Most recently passed to France in the late 18th century, the town was extensively fortified by Louis XVI. During WWII the Germans held Cherbourg until it was captured by the American forces shortly after the Normandy landings. Following a vast rehabilitation program that returned it to working condition, Cherbourg became an important Allied supply port. Today, Cherbourg is important for transatlantic shipping, shipbuilding, electronics and telephone equipment manufacturing, yachting and commercial fishing.

Rouen (Paris), France
The capital of upper Normandy and fifth largest port in France, picturesque and historic Rouen is renowned as a treasury of medieval architecture. With a large part of the city destroyed during World War II resulting in massive postwar reconstruction, Rouen today appears as an interesting blend of ancient and modern. Fortunately, it has kept its medieval character with still-inhabited houses dating from the 15th century, which line its narrow cobblestone streets. Among the city's most noteworthy attractions are the magnificent Cathedrale Notre-Dame built during the 13th century, and the famous Gros-Horloge, a giant Renaissance clock looming over the renowned pedestrian street of the same name. Two blocks away is the Place du Vieux Marche, or old market square, where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. She is publicly commemorated at the site on the last Sunday of each May. The "City of a Hundred Spires" as Rouen is known, was an inspiration for Monet's impressionistic cathedral paintings. Rouen also makes an excellent point of departure for a visit to Paris, the "City of Light."

Dunkirk (Lille), France
Dunkirk is France’s third-largest port. Located on the low-lying area of French Flanders near the Belgian border. It is perhaps most famous as the site of the “Dunkirk Miracle” evacuation of nearly 400,000 troops from under the guns of the German forces during WWII in May of 1940. By order of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and fleet of over 900 ships and boats was dispatched across the English Channel and retrieved the British and French troops trapped there to safety in England. Less well-known, the free-standing Dunkirk Belfry played an important role as one pole of a scientific measurement at the end of the 18th century that resulted in the creation of the standard meter length measure. Nearby Lille, France possesses one of the most gracious city centers in Europe, the Grand Place, graced with beautiful and elaborate civic buildings and churches. In 2020, the handsome university city will be named France’s first World Design Capital.

Brussels (Antwerp), Belgium
The Belgian capital is also the capital of the European Union and the headquarters of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). It is one of Europe’s most important cities for business, politics and culture. The city possesses some 80 museums and, as the birthplace of a number of Europe’s most famous comic books, even has a Comic Book Route leading to exterior murals of familiar characters such as Tintin. One notable architectural site is the elaborate Guildhalls of Grand Place. Nearby Antwerp is famous for the World Diamond Centre, though which flow virtually all of the gem quality diamonds in the trade. Antwerp’s Central Station is also a gem, for connoisseurs of Golden Age railway architecture.

Dover (London), England, UK
Crossing the English Channel from continental Europe to Great Britain, the first view of England is the milky-white strip of land called the White Cliffs of Dover. As you get closer, the coastline unfolds before you in all its striking beauty. White chalk cliffs with streaks of black flint rise straight from the sea to a height of 350’ (110 m).


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