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Regal, Scandinavia & Russia Grand Adventure ex Ft Lauderdale to Helsinki

Ship: Regal Princess View ship details

Cruise Line: Princess Cruises

Selected Sailing Date: 14 Apr 2019

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Cabin Twin Triple Quad Single
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** Pricing is Per Person, including all taxes.

* Fares displayed are lowest available and may not include Promotional Benefits

Please note: while prices and inclusions are accurate at time of loading they are subject to change due to changes in cruise line policies and pricing and due to currency fluctuations. Currency surcharges may apply. Please check details of price and inclusions at time of booking.

Cruise Description

18 Night Cruise sailing from Ft Lauderdale to Helsinki aboard Regal Princess.

Enjoy sweeping views from one of more than 1,400 balconies on Regal Princess or stroll on the SeaWalk®, a glass-floor walkway extending 28 feet beyond the edge of the ship! From the tranquil Sanctuary, a retreat reserved for adults, to the dazzling Princess WaterColor Fantasy light and water show and more, you'll find diversions for every mood.

Highlights of this cruise:

Ft Lauderdale, Florida
According to the popular 1960 beach movie, Fort Lauderdale is "where the boys are." The city's reputation as America's Spring Break capital, however, has been replaced with the more favorable image of a prime family tourist destination, attracting more than 10 million visitors annually. The most popular beach resort in Florida is even more rightly famed as the "Yachting Capital of the World," with more than 40,000 registered crafts calling its waters home. The city also prides itself on being the "Venice of America" with more than 300 miles of navigable waterways. Fort Lauderdale boasts world-class theaters, museums, sightseeing, and shopping.

The city sits 24 miles north of Miami and is named after a series of forts built by the United States during the second Seminole War. The forts took their name from Major William Lauderdale, who was the commander of the detachment of soldiers who built the first fort. Look hard and you might find remnants of three of them today. More people seem to be interested in taking a water tour aboard the "Carrie B."

Azores Islands (Ponta Delgada), Portugal
Rising from the depths of the Atlantic, the rugged, volcanic Azores lie 800 miles off the coast of Portugal. Colonized by the Portuguese in the 16th century, the nine islands have provided a haven to Atlantic mariners for over five centuries. The Azores offer travelers spectacular landscapes that range from lush meadows fringed with brightly colored hydrangea to ancient caldera filled with lakes. And the many small villages and shops retain an otherworldly air and 18th-century charm.

Ponta Delgada is located on São Miguel, the largest of the nine Azores. The island's rich volcanic soil sustains fields of tobacco and tea, vineyards, and pineapple greenhouses. The Azores are also noted for fine crafts, particularly basketry and pottery.

Brussels/Bruges (Zeebrugge), Belgium
Zeebrugge is your gateway to Brussels. The capital of Belgium, Brussels is really two cities in one. Old Brussels is a city of superb Baroque architecture with ornate guildhalls, cobbled lanes and one of the finest squares in Europe. New Brussels is the modern city, the capital of the European Union, the home of NATO and the seat of the European Atomic Energy Community. It is a city of fascinating contrasts.

Rotterdam, The Netherlands
The largest port in Europe, Rotterdam is an intriguing mix of the old and the new. The city's lineage is ancient - Count Willem III granted city rights to the sleepy fishing village on the Rotte in 1328, yet much of the city dates from the six decades following the end of World War II. An important industrial center and a major European port, Rotterdam was among the first targets of the Nazi blitzkrieg against the West. On May 14, 1940, the German Luftwaffe firebombed the city, Rotterdam was gutted. The post-war years saw a slow rebuilding but by the early 1960s the maze of port facilities extended all the way to the North Sea. Today, this city of over half a million is the economic powerhouse, not just of the Netherlands but of Northern Europe.

The Nazi bombardment of 1940 gutted most of the old city. As a result, Rotterdam's architecture is an intriguing mix of old and new: modern glass skyscrapers often stand adjacent to 19th- and 18th-century buildings.

Aarhus, Denmark
It's easy to assume that Aarhus stands in Copenhagen's shadow - Aarhus after all is the second largest city in Denmark but despite this fact, it only has close to 260.000 inhabitants, compared to the 600.000 of Copenhagen. Århus university is both the country's second oldest and second largest. Being recognized as the student´s city in Denmark it gives it a youthful vibe. Yet Aarhus boasts a traditional and relaxed feeling at the same time, as the city has kept in many of its areas the unique Danish buildings, combined with some of the most modern and fine new Danish designs. Early Archeological findings date Århus´s founding in 770. Famous internationally for its extensive cultural scene; you can find some of the best Museums in Denmark. It is also rich in parks and green areas. Located on Jutland's east coast, Aarhus is surrounded by dense forests, and provides easy access to Denmark's scenic Lake District west of the city and it also holds the queen's summer residence beautifully set at the rim of the forest overlooking the sea.

Originally constructed in the 12th century, Aarhus's Domkirke is one of the greatest cathedrals in Scandinavia. Its immense copper spire stands over 300 feet high, making it - ironically - the second tallest bell tower in Northern Europe.

Copenhagen, Denmark
Copenhagen was founded during the 12th century. The city owes much of its charm to the buildings erected by Denmark's monarchs, and boasts a treasure trove of late-Renaissance and Rococo architecture.

Copenhagen deserves its accolade as the Venice of the North. Founded on a series of islands and islets, the city today is laced with graceful canals and boasts some of the most delightful architecture in Northern Europe. See the fabled statue of Hans Christian Andersen's Little Mermaid, a symbol of the city. Stroll along the old harbor of Nyhavn, lined with cafés, restaurants and 500-year-old gabled houses. Browse the superb shops on the world-famous Stroget or view the Rococo palaces lining Amalienborg Square. Best of all, savor the taste of local delicacies while wandering the paths of Tivoli Gardens, one of Europe's most celebrated pleasure gardens.

Stockholm (Nynashamn), Sweden
The small rocky harbor of Nynashamn is your gateway port to Stockholm, the "Capital of Scandinavia." The city began life over seven centuries ago as a Viking stronghold built on the island of Gamla Stan. Today, Stockholm covers 14 separate islands and is interwoven with bays, channels and inlets. The city skyline is a sea of copper roofs grown green with patina, towers, spires and graceful cupolas stand sentinel over the historic Old Town (Gamla Stan). A city of nearly a million people, Stockholm is one of the world's most beautiful, clean, and orderly metropolises.

With a history stretching over seven centuries, Stockholm is not just a beautiful city but also Sweden's center of art and culture.

Note: Your ship will anchor in Nynashamn and use launches to transport all passengers ashore.

Helsinki, Finland
Perhaps their country's harsh climate encouraged the Finns' love and respect for design and the arts. Whatever the cause, there's no denying that Helsinki is one of the most vibrant and beautiful cities in Scandinavia. Hailed as the "Daughter of the Baltic," Finland's capital is a city of graceful neoclassical buildings, striking modern architecture and spacious boulevards dotted with squares and parks. In the past century, Finland has nurtured some of the major creative talents of Western culture, from the composer Sibelius to architects Eliel & Eero Saarinen and Alvar Aalto.

The center of Finnish commerce and culture, Helsinki is home to some 616.000 people. Much of the city's neoclassical architecture dates from the period of Tsarist rule, which began in 1809 after political control of Finland passed from Sweden to Russia, Finland gained its independence in 1917.